How would Hume reply to Kant saying there are synthetic a priori propositions?


How did Kant respond to Hume?

Kant agrees with Hume that neither the relation of cause and effect nor the idea of necessary connection is given in our sensory perceptions; both, in an important sense, are contributed by our mind.

How did Kant respond to Hume’s problem of induction?

In short, Kant’s answer is that ‘causality’ isn’t, contra Hume, merely constant perceived conjunction. If this is the case, then the problem of induction applies and it is not possible to infer that there is a necessary connection between a cause and its effect.

What does Kant mean by synthetic a priori?

Kant’s answer: Synthetic a priori knowledge is possible because all knowledge is only of appearances (which must conform to our modes of experience) and not of independently real things in themselves (which are independent of our modes of experience).

How do Kant and Hume differ?

Hume’s method of moral philosophy is experimental and empirical; Kant emphasizes the necessity of grounding morality in a priori principles. Hume says that reason is properly a “slave to the passions,” while Kant bases morality in his conception of a reason that is practical in itself.

How did Kant refute Hume?

In the theoretical domain, Kant argues against Humean skepticism by treating the principles he attacks as synthetic a priori rather than a posteriori, and then arguing for the possibility of such judgments by means, in part, of the transcendental idealist claim that our knowledge does not extend to things in themselves …

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What is synthetic a priori knowledge?

There are a priori, synthetic judgments. These are judgments that are known through pure reason alone, independent of experience, and they are ampliative to knowledge. Most mathematical, geometrical and metaphysical judgments that we can be certain of fall under this combination.

What do Kant and Hume agree on?

Hume and Kant both treat the concepts of virtue and vice as central to human morality. But they differ on the basic nature of virtue, and they present different catalogues of particular virtues and vices. Kant’s discussions reflect his consistent emphasis on freedom, dignity, rationality, and purity of motive.