Is this really an omniscience vs free-will paradox?

Nope, and here’s why. To have free will means that there is no knowing what you will and will not do until it occurs, and only then does it get set in stone. Omniscience means that a being (in this case, God) is all knowing of past, present, and future and knows everything that happens before it does.

Does omniscience negate free will?

Omniscience does not negate free will. The reason for this conclusion is that having a given “power” is not the same as no choice in using it! God also has free will, he can chose how much or how little he wants to use any of His powers.

Can omniscience and free will coexist?

The argument from free will, also called the paradox of free will or theological fatalism, contends that omniscience and free will are incompatible and that any conception of God that incorporates both properties is therefore inconceivable.

Is omniscience a paradox?

Omnipotence is only one of the attributes of God which has been thought to lead to paradox; another is omniscience. Omniscience seems, at first glance, easy to define: for a being to be omniscient is for that being to know all the truths.

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Is omniscience logically possible?

But the logic of our language does not show how such a statement, even if it happened to be untrue, could ever be self-contradictory. That implies knowing what is by definition unknown: the non- existence of unknown facts. Hence omniscience is impossible.

Why is free will an illusion?

Free will is an illusion. Our wills are simply not of our own making. Thoughts and intentions emerge from background causes of which we are unaware and over which we exert no conscious control. We do not have the freedom we think we have.

Does the Bible say about free will?

In the Bible

The biblical ground for free will lies in the fall into sin by Adam and Eve that occurred in their “willfully chosen” disobedience to God. “Freedom” and “free will” can be treated as one because the two terms are commonly used as synonyms.

Is free will not an illusion?

Many scientists think that free-will is an illusion. That is, intentions, choices, and decisions are made by subconscious mind, which only lets the conscious mind know what was willed after the fact. This argument was promoted long ago by scholars like Darwin, Huxley, and Einstein.

Does predestination contradict free will?

Some accept predestination, but most believe in free will. The whole idea of predestination is based on the belief that God is omnipotent and nothing can occur without His willing it. Some believe that God knows the future, but He does not predestine it.

Is free will important?

It may therefore be unsurprising that some studies have shown that people who believe in free will are more likely to have positive life outcomes – such as happiness, academic success and better work performance .

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Do philosophers believe in free will?

Philosophers and scientists who believe that the universe is indeterministic and that humans possess free will are known as “libertarians” (libertarianism in this sense is not to be confused with the school of political philosophy called libertarianism).

What do libertarians believe about free will?

Libertarians believe that free will is incompatible with causal determinism, and agents have free will. They therefore deny that causal determinism is true. There are three major categories of libertarians. Event-causal libertarians believe that free actions are indeterministically caused by prior events.

Why does Neuroscience not disprove free will?

Neuroscience does not disprove our intuition of free will. Decision models of Libet-type experiments are compatible with conscious free will. Brain activation preceding conscious decisions reflects the decision process rather than a decision.

Can we disprove free will?

To be clear, it is very unlikely that a single study could disprove all definitions of free will. Definitions of free will can vary wildly, and each must be considered separately in light of existing empirical evidence. There have also been a number of problems regarding studies of free will.

What part of the brain controls free will?

Free will, or at least the place where we decide to act, is sited in a part of the brain called the parietal cortex, new research suggests.