Kant and categorical imperative dilemma?

One of Kant’s categorical imperatives is the universalizability principle, in which one should “act only in accordance with that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it become a universal law.” In lay terms, this simply means that if you do an action, then everyone else should also be able to do it.

What are Kant’s two categorical imperatives?

Here are two formulation of Kant’s Categorical Imperative: CIa: Always treat persons (including yourself) and ends in themselves, never merely as a means to your own ends. CIb: Act only on that maxim that you can consistently will to be a universal law.

What is wrong with the categorical imperative?

A second lingering problem with the categorical imperative concerns Kant’s belief that the various formulas of it were only different ways of expressing the same underlying conviction. For Kant, the feature that underlies all four of them is that we should be guided by our rational conception of duty.

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What are three principles of Kant’s categorical imperatives?