Meaning of Spinoza’s First Axiom

1.1.1 Definitions. 1D1: By cause of itself I understand that whose essence involves existence, or that whose nature cannot be conceived except as existing. This first definition provides us with Spinoza’s sense of ’cause of itself’. The impor- tance of this cannot be over-emphasized.

What does Spinoza mean by God?

Spinoza believed that God is “the sum of the natural and physical laws of the universe and certainly not an individual entity or creator”.

What does Spinoza mean by infinite?

absolutely necessary, Eternal being never begin or cease to exist; Spinoza calls “an infinite enjoyment of existence or – pardon the Latin – of being (essendi)” (102). The spatial or Extended Attributes of Substance likewise do not allow parts or division.

What is mode according to Spinoza?

Modes are defined by Spinoza things which inhere in and are conceived through substance. It is very natural to suppose that both entities like dents and properties inhere in and are conceived through substance. The category of mode would then comprise both properties and objects-exemplifying-properties.

What did Spinoza say about God and nature?

Spinoza’s metaphysics of God is neatly summed up in a phrase that occurs in the Latin (but not the original Dutch) edition of the Ethics: “God, or Nature”, Deus, sive Natura: “That eternal and infinite being we call God, or Nature, acts from the same necessity from which he exists” (Part IV, Preface).

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What would Spinoza’s God say?

Spinoza was born in Amsterdam in the 17th century of a businessman father who was successful but not wealthy. To him, God would have said: “Stop praying and giving yourselves blows on your chests, what I want you to do is to go out into the world to enjoy your life.

What did Spinoza say?

Spinoza’s most famous and provocative idea is that God is not the creator of the world, but that the world is part of God. This is often identified as pantheism, the doctrine that God and the world are the same thing – which conflicts with both Jewish and Christian teachings.

What is Spinoza’s argument?

Spinoza’s Ontological Argument, once unpacked, is as follows: When two things have nothing in common, one cannot be the cause of the other (Premise 1, E1p3). It is impossible for two substances to have the same attribute (or essence) (Premise 2, E1p5).