The Gettier problem

The Gettier problem, in the field of epistemology, is a landmark philosophical problem concerning the understanding of descriptive knowledge. Attributed to American philosopher Edmund Gettier, Gettier-type counterexamples (called “Gettier-cases”) challenge the long-held justified true belief (JTB) account of knowledge.

What is the gettier problem examples?

Here’s another Gettier case: You have a justified belief that someone in your office owns a Ford. And as it happens it’s true that someone in your office owns a Ford. However, your evidence for your belief all concerns Nogot, who as it turns out owns no Ford.

What is the gettier problem for dummies?

A Gettier problem is any example that demonstrates that an individual can satisfy the classical analysis of knowledge – justified true belief – without possessing knowledge.

Why is the gettier problem a problem?

On the face of it, Gettier cases do indeed show only that not all actual or possible justified true beliefs are knowledge — rather than that a belief’s being justified and true is never enough for its being knowledge.

Is there a solution to the Gettier problem?

The second sense in which the Gettier problem might be solved involves developing a new theory or analysis of knowledge that is not subject to Gettier-type refutation. Not surprisingly, solutions of this second kind also frequently result in the generation of new, higher-level Gettier examples.

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What is Gettier argument?

Gettier argues that if an agent is justified in believing (g), even though (g) is actually false, then that agent is justified in deducing (h) from (g) and therefore believing that (h). Under such circumstances, (h) is false, because it depends upon (g), which is false.

What did Gettier say about knowledge?

Gettier presented two cases in which a true belief is inferred from a justified false belief. He observed that, intuitively, such beliefs cannot be knowledge; it is merely lucky that they are true. In honour of his contribution to the literature, cases like these have come to be known as “Gettier cases”.

Is knowledge justified true belief Gettier?

The JTB account holds that knowledge is equivalent to justified true belief; if all three conditions (justification, truth, and belief) are met of a given claim, then we have knowledge of that claim.

Is justified true belief knowledge Gettier essay?

Gettier’s main protest against ‘justified true belief’ is the fact that a person can use it to believe falsehoods. This argument is valid because believing in a proposition chiefly depends on the truthfulness of a conviction. Consequently, ‘believing’ a falsehood cannot be equated to ‘knowing’ it.

What is the best response to Gettier?

A Proposed Solution

The widespread response to the Gettier Problem (as it has come to be known) has been to admit that justification, truth, and belief are individually necessary but jointly insufficient for knowledge and to propose some fourth condition on knowledge.

Why gettier cases are misleading?

Gettier cases are cases of reference failure because the candidates for knowledge in these cases contain ambiguous designators. If this is correct, then we may simply be mistaking semantic facts for epistemic facts when we consider Gettier cases.

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